Assessments by external consultants have major benefits too!

Although I personally believe that doing it yourself is one of the best ways to successfully improve, in-house assessments have severe drawbacks as well.

SEPNumber one: you are part of the team that is being assessed and are therefore biased. No matter how rational and objective you try to be. During one of my assignments, I came across an effect called “Somebody Else’s Problem (SEP)”. I think this describes best what the consequences of being biased can be. Maybe we even use a so called SEP-field generator to help overlook issues within our own approach and team.

Number two: your coworkers are hesitant to share their weak spots with you because they fear you might use anything they say against them in the next project. As a consequence you will not find the root cause of recurring issues or the real issues preventing things to improve.

Number three: experienced consultants have performed assessments many times before, understand the assessment models, and are efficient in surveying organizations. Because of their independence, they can dare to ask questions about “everything you’ve always wanted to know but were afraid to ask.”

Number four: external consultants bring a wealth of experience form other organizations. They have helped other organizations improve their testing and usually have access to several good practices that might help you make that next step. I’ve also learned that as an external consultant it’s easier to point out that certain existing habits should change.

Number five: when you’re leading an improvement initiative yourself, you might overdo it and strive to become the best in test. But your companies focus is on delivering the right product and/or service to your customers. Which implies that being efficient in testing might be enough. External consultants can help you decide what level is enough based on their experience at similar organizations.

Number six: even if you’re a craftsman, well-trained, experienced and knowledgeable, it is always good to have someone else come in and discuss with you what you’re doing and how you’re doing it.

CloutNumber seven: your findings and recommendations, no matter how well reasoned and well-presented they are, do not have the “clout” that an outside assessor brings. This is a strange phenomenon that I’ve encountered quite often: an in-house group has performed an assessment and has made recommendations to management that are simply ignored. Later, when we are asked as external consultant to perform an assessment, we make in essence the same recommendations, management responds positively to our report, and the recommendations are implemented.

The hints, tips and tricks I listed in my previous blog also apply to anyone performing an assessment. One additional, crucial tip when using an external assessment team. Make sure that you do not focus on knowledge of and experience with process improvement models, but please check if the assessment team incorporates a wealth of experience in testing at any level.

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