Why improvement usually fails…

If you want to improve you have to invest time and money. What usually happens, is that you look for what everyone at that moment considers to be the right thing to do. So you tend to adopt the test approach, including tools and templates, that is “hot”.

Head in HandsLet’s say, you decide to implement risk based testing. You learn how to translate business risks into an appropriate test approach, including techniques, and create a beautiful plan and strategy.  And then? Your (pilot) project starts and fails…
Why, you wonder. You applied everything you learned, went to conferences, listened to the gurus, read the books, hired expensive consultants, …

As a test consultant I had the privilege to work in different organisations and projects and discovered a trend in “failures” and “successes”.  It boils down to one common denominator: did you or didn’t you involve the people who do the “real thing” in the test process? Yes, the ones that do the actual work a.k.a. the testers.  Somehow, they do not get involved in the early stages of test improvement.

We tend to start with test management, make the test organisation more professional, develop a test strategy, follow a lifecycle (plan, prepare and execute), use the right tools, select adequate test design techniques … According to the book! Don’t we make the same mistake at the start of a project? Forget to involve those same testers in the early stages?  When we define a test strategy and write a test plan, we talk to the business, the developers, all of our stakeholders, …

Don’t forget: the testers are the most important part of your test process and improvements, they have to learn to apply the new methods, tools and templates. In fact, they are the ones that have to change the most!

27-teamworkI found out the hard way that a few days training – even from the guys that wrote the book – is not enough for that senior business tester that has been there for over 10 years and knows the system inside out… And what about the “fire fighters” that have become heroes because they find, fix and retest defects quickly? They will not be convinced, they won ’t even attend!

So it’s all about people and how you involve them.  Take into account the capabilities and potential of your test engineers. Listen to what they have to say.  On the short term, you might end up at a maturity level you do not like. Or your approach is not exactly what you want it to be. But you know what, if you help them manage the transition, they will reward you with the highest level possible in the shortest possible time.  You will become truly successful.

It’s not your test management approach that decides how successful you are, your test engineers make it or break it. TMap? ISTQB? RST? As long as your people are able and capable to apply it in their day to day work.

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One thought on “Why improvement usually fails…

  1. I really do like the article, concerning test process improvement I am looking always for new input and ideas to work on. cheers for that and greetings from far berlin.

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